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Leadership and Management for Safety

GSR Part 2

Leadership and Management for Safety

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GSR Part 2

Leadership and Management for Safety

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Footnotes
1‘Radiation’ as used here means ionizing radiation.
2INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY, The Management System for Facilities and Activities, IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-3, IAEA, Vienna (2006).
3Economic objectives are included in the list of elements that have to be integrated, as it is recognized that economic decisions and actions may introduce, or may mitigate, potential risks.
4‘Leadership’ is the use of an individual’s capabilities and competences to give direction to individuals and groups and to influence their commitment to achieving the fundamental safety objective and to applying the fundamental safety principles, by means of shared goals, values and behaviour. ‘Management’ is a formal, authorized function for ensuring that an organization operates efficiently and that work is completed in accordance with requirements, plans and resources. Managers at all levels need to be leaders for safety.
5‘Facilities’ includes: nuclear facilities; irradiation installations; some mining and raw material processing facilities such as uranium mines; radioactive waste management facilities; and any other places where radioactive material is produced, processed, used, handled, stored or disposed of — or where radiation generators are installed — on such a scale that consideration of protection and safety is required. ‘Activities’ includes: the production, use, import and export of radiation sources for industrial, research and medical purposes; the transport of radioactive material; the decommissioning of facilities; radioactive waste management activities such as the discharge of effluents; and some aspects of the remediation of sites affected by residues from past activities.
6The term ‘radiation risks’ is defined as:
7‘Arrangements’ in this context means an integrated set of infrastructural elements necessary to provide the capability for performing a specified function or task. Such elements may include authorities and responsibilities, organization, coordination, personnel, plans, procedures, facilities, equipment, training and contracts.
8International standards are, for example, those of the International Organization for Standardization or the European Foundation for Quality Management; national standards are, for example, British standards on Occupational Health and Safety Management or the Nuclear Quality Assurance standards of the United States of America.
9Some personnel are accredited or authorized by means of a regulatory process that may be separate or partly separate from the organization’s management. However, the maintenance of skills and knowledge, and the continued eligibility for accreditation or authorization, will be the responsibility of the senior management throughout the period of time for which a person is employed by the organization.
10‘Resources’ includes individuals (the number of individuals and their competences), infrastructure, the working environment, knowledge and information, and suppliers, as well as material and financial resources.
11The supply chain, described as ‘suppliers’, typically includes: designers, vendors, manufacturers and constructors, employers, contractors, subcontractors, and consigners and carriers who supply safety related items. The supply chain can also include other parts of the organization and parent organizations.
12The capability of the organization to have a clear understanding and knowledge of the product or service to be supplied is sometimes termed an ‘informed customer’ capability.
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Tags applicable to this publication

  • Publication type:General Safety Requirements
  • Publication number: GSR Part 2
  • Publication year: 2016
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